Learning our Heritage

At the Somaiya Center for Experiential Learning we design immersive learning experiences in the areas of Heritage Conservation and Environmental Sustainability that enables participants to be curious, creative, think critically and feel empowered to participate in issues that affect the community and the world around them.

In India, we are blessed with the legacy of a rich heritage – tangible and intangible. Some of the historical monuments are centuries old and don’t fail to enthral generation after generation. These monuments are filled with stories – of communities that lived there, their occupation their lifestyle, their art and culture. These spaces provide excellent opportunities to not just learn about history but also about the heritage that surrounds it – both natural and cultural heritage.

While history is the study of our past; heritage refers to the objects and values that belong to the past, looked after in the present for the benefit of the future. Heritage – tangible or intangible, gives us a sense of identity & belonging. It gives us insights into where we come from and who we are and helps build understanding and respect for diversity.

Our recent experiential learning journey to explore the ruins of Pattadakal and Bijapur – with an archaeologist, a guide, a renowned Bharatnatyam dancer, a French researcher, and a bunch of students in tow – provided different perspectives about our past that we otherwise fail to learn from school textbooks.

It all started with a site based learning programme that we designed for school kids as part of the Somaiya Center for Experiential Learning.

Along with 44 kids and a few teacher volunteers, we set off at 7am from a place called Sameerwadi in Bagalkot district of Karnataka. Our first destination was Pattadakal – a place known for its exquisite display of both the Indo-Aryan and Dravidian style of architecture. These beautiful sepia coloured majestic temple structures chiselled to perfection are a delight to the eyes and the soul.

DSC_0807Mr Chandru was our local guide and one with excellent storytelling skills and full of fascinating trivia spoke with passion as he explained how Pattadakal got its name – ‘Patta’ means ‘Crown’ and this is where the kings of the Chalukyan dynasty were crowned”! It was the place of coronation! The river Malaprabha at this location flows South to North just like river Ganga does at Varanasi. This is considered very auspicious and perhaps one of the reasons selected as a place of importance by the Kings.

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Mr Pavitra Krishna Bhat is a renowned Bharatnatyam dancer and alumni of S.K Somaiya College of Art and Commerce. Dressed in his vibrant Bharatnatyam costume he highlighted the various sculptures and narrated the secret stories hidden therein using dance as a medium of communication. His session on ‘movement’ highlighted how one art-form informs and inspires other different art forms.

 

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Bijapur also known as Vijayapura, which is not too far away from Pattdakal was our second destination. The dusty city is dotted with old monuments, tombs, mausoleums, old city walls, and the very famous Gol Gumbaz (the Circular Dome) – that displays the architectural prowess of the Adil Shahi dynasty. What fascinated us the most was the cultural confluence in art and architecture! This city of domes and minarets has architectural and engineering masterpieces that exemplify the confluence of many cultures in the Deccan – where lotuses bloom on geometric minarets, where paintings of yoginis hang alongside those of fakirs and princes, and where a poem may have words in Urdu and Sanskrit in such beautiful balance that it makes you want to dance!

We learn much about conflicts in our history books but the rich cultural heritage that underlines the essence of India can best be experienced through a minds-on – a hands-on approach to learning. Bijapur is a perfect place to discover how two cultures coming together can create both conflict and confluence.

 

Learning about traditional water harvesting systems from French Researcher

 

Our 3 days were spent in a plethora of activities from understanding traditional water harvesting systems employed during the Adil Shah period that is still active to working with local nomadic tribes to learn their intricate embroidery techniques and just marvelling at the use of ‘stucco’ as a building material that has stood the test of time.

 

Interacting with local ambadi tribe

 

Our students also spent time trying to influence other tourists to be more mindful regarding littering around the monuments! They observed uncouth behaviour among other tourists and students visiting the monuments and reflected on their own behaviour. With the help of officers from the Archeological Survey of India, students discussed the need for conservation and the myriad issues in protecting our shared heritage.

 

At the Somaiya Center for Experiential Learning we design immersive learning experiences in the areas of Heritage Conservation and Environmental Sustainability that enables participants to be curious, creative, think critically and feel empowered to participate in issues that affect the community and the world around them.

 

By

SUDHA IYER
Programmes & Communication Manager,
Somaiya Centre for Experiential Learning

Theatre in the classrooms

. Theatre, when embedded in the educational process, can lead to the holistic development of learners viz_ the social, cultural, emotional and spiritual dimensions of the learners.
We at K. J. Somaiya Comprehensive College of Education, Training & Research emphasize theatre training in our Teacher Education program through a course, ‘Drama, Art & Aesthetics in Education.

All the world’s a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts.

So said Shakespeare, the great dramatist of all times.

Theatre is generally thought of as a form of literary art pursued by a few creative writers for a small target group of literature and art-lovers or as a medium of entertainment for the larger public. But it has immense scope in the education system not only as a co-curricular activity but in the classrooms during the regular teaching-learning process as a methodology of teaching. The techniques of drama & role-play can be employed to make instructional process more interesting, effective and meaningful. Theatre, when embedded in the educational process, can lead to the holistic development of learners viz_ the social, cultural, emotional and spiritual dimensions of the learners.
Social Dimension:
Drama being a collaborative Art form, engages many people at the same time, developing the values of cooperation and team spirit among participants. The participants are required to keenly observe the real people, their languages, mannerisms, behaviour patterns, etc. and understand their inner motivations so as to recreate it realistically.
Theatre also has a huge potential to become an agent of social change & reform. Dramas based on social issues such as corruption, unemployment, Poverty, Child Labor, Gender Inequality environmental management and so on can develop awareness regarding such issues and help in fighting & eradicating social evils. Through drama, learners can also be trained for democratic citizenship so as to make our largest democracy function effectively.
Cultural Dimension:
Culture is not only an amalgamation of customs, traditions, beliefs & value systems to be learnt & imitated by members of the society. It must be assimilated at inner psychic levels so that it endows a member with a sense of identity & belongingness. Careful observation & participation in the Dramatic forms such as Bhavai, Tamasha, Ramleela, Yatra & Yakshagana can provide insights into the rich cultural heritage of India and develop a sense of ‘pride’ for their own culture.
Emotional Dimension:
Drama is now also utilized as a Therapy. The therapeutic use of Drama gives very positive results in the cure of psychosomatic disorders. The student population of today is increasingly being gripped by psycho-somatic disorders such as depression, neurosis, ‘anomie’ and so on. Theatre, allows free voice & expression to the pent-up emotions, provides catharsis which results in healing the deep emotional scars and wounds. Also, by enacting multiple characters with a plethora of divergent human emotions, the participants learn to understand complex human emotions but also develop an emotionally rich personality capable of empathy.
Spiritual Dimension:

Theatre across the world has originated from religious rituals. Although religion and spirituality are not exactly the same, each religion has a component of spirituality. Traditional folk dramas with stories based on mythology beautifully connect the human & divine or the concrete, real and manifested world with the abstract, unreal and unmanifested world. Thus, theatre becomes a vehicle to transport the participants to a transcendental higher reality. It can also embark them on a journey to their inner worlds to explore the meaning & purpose of their own existence and lives.
Concluding, as a Teacher Educator, I strongly reiterate the need for incorporating theatre into the educational process. This does not imply that all teachers must be good playwrights, directors or actors. However, it does imply that teachers must be aware of the immense potential of theatre in education. It also suggests the need for the presence of theatre personnel in every educational institution and also a meaningful collaboration of institutions of academic disciplines with the institutions of Performing Arts.

We at K. J. Somaiya Comprehensive College of Education, Training & Research emphasize theatre training in our Teacher Education program through a course, ‘Drama, Art & Aesthetics in Education. The theatrical training is provided not only by theoretical knowledge but by organizing workshops on Dramatic Script Writing & Acting by professional theatre personnel, by encouraging students to participate in theatre as part of co-curricular activities and also incorporate theatre as a methodology during their internship programs in various schools.

 

By

Dr Sarla A Santwani

Principal,

K J Somaiya Comprehensive College of Education, Training and Research

The Somaiya School students shine in Taekwondo Competition

Praveen Shaikh, Principal Somaiya School, beaming with pride says “ Taekwondo or indeed any martial art, teaches children self-defence, discipline, concentration and discipline. They learn to respect others. Students get physically fit and energised, and the best part is they learn all this while having fun.”

37 schools from Mumbai, 380 participants

from Standards 1-10th 

at The Taekwondo Games 2018

organised by Pil Sung Taekwondo Academy for children 

The Somaiya School students ranging from 6 years to 13 years lit up the medal chart with 6 gold, 1 silver and 1 bronze medal! 

 

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Manuel Mendonca. 4th Degree Belt in Taekwondo from World Taekwondo Competition, Kukiwon trained the students and is now keen for them to go to the National level. He says “Taekwondo is for everybody, there is no age limit for anyone. Even at the age of 80-81 a person can do Taekwondo.

The student’s parents were thrilled as they were a witness to their achievement.

Praveen Shaikh, Principal Somaiya School, beaming with pride says “ Taekwondo or indeed any martial art, teaches children self-defence, discipline, concentration and discipline. They learn to respect others. Students get physically fit and energised, and the best part is they learn all this while having fun.”

International Day of Education

Understanding the importance of education in the development of the individual, the family, the country and the world, the key goal of Somaiya Vidyavihar Education Trust has been building institutions that enable the means to realize it. We believe that be it in urban or rural areas of the country access to education must be matched by the quality of education

On December 3rd 2018, the United Nations General Assembly adopted a resolution to observe 24th January (starting from 2019) as the International day of Education, to celebrate the role of education in development. The resolution demonstrated the world’s political will towards providing quality education to all and achieving sustainable development by 2030.

It only reiterates the premise on which Somaiya Vidyavihar was founded.

The vision of our Founder

ज्ञानादेव तु कैवल्यम्

Knowledge alone liberates.

Resonates in the vision of UNESCO

Our vision is to transform lives through education, recognizing the important role of education as a main driver of development and in achieving the other proposed SDGs. We commit with a sense of urgency to a single, renewed education agenda that is holistic, ambitious and aspirational, leaving no one behind.

DSC_0040Knowledge alone liberates. Liberates from the cycle of poverty, by improving health outcomes, promoting gender equality, environmental sustainability and building peaceful and resilient societies.

Also, to liberate one from the attachments that bind us to small-mindedness. Knowledge also provides opportunities. To make a life lived more meaningful. In the service of one’s family, one’s community, one’s society, country, and indeed the world.

DSC_0021 (1).JPGUnderstanding the importance of education in the development of the individual, the family, the country and the world, the key goal of Somaiya Vidyavihar Education Trust has been building institutions that enable the means to realize it. We believe that be it in urban or rural areas of the country access to education must be matched by the quality of education.

Robotics 2016 Sakarwadi (37)Towards that goal, Somaiya Vidyavihar Education Trust has invited global and national experts in various aspects of education to strengthen our education system and respond to contemporary challenges in education keeping in mind the underlying principle of holistic development of the student.

 

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Our work in educational development from pre-school to higher education is aimed at contributing towards the higher goal of human development.

 

 

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As we celebrate our 60 years, we must commit ourselves further to this vision.

The role that we play as educationists is of greater importance in today’s times as the world sees challenges never imagined before.

 

By

Prof. V. N. Rajasekharan Pillai

Provost Somaiya Vidyavihar

provost 2018 2

 

 

 

Somaiya Vidyavihar student saves 20 lives !
Saurabh Lanke, a 19-year-old student emerged a hero in the fire that broke out in a residential high-rise in Mumbai. He helped rescue more than 20 people who were stuck on the top floors of Sargam Society at Chembur, many of whom were senior citizens.
Saurabh Lanke was felicitated by Higher Education Minister Shri Vinod Tawde for his exemplary show of courage.
He and his proud parents narrate the sequence of events of the blaze.

Our girls continue to gain glory at the national level sports.

Sharvari Parulekar, a student of K J Somaiya Science and Commerce, represented Maharashtra at the 34th National Junior Athletics Championship. She bagged a silver medal with a jump of 11.99 meters in the Triple Jump event.

 

Sharvari Parulekar, a student of K J Somaiya Science and Commerce, represented Maharashtra at the 34th National Junior Athletics Championship. She bagged a silver medal with a jump of 11.99 meters in the Triple Jump event.

Sharvari’s main events are Long Jump, Triple Jump, 100M Hurdles and Heptathlon. She was selected to represent Maharashtra after her amazing performance at the State level meet at Satara.

She has also won the Gold medal at the Khelo India Youth Games in Pune.

Hearty congratulations to her and her support system. We wish her continued success.

Sharvari joined athletics at the age of 7 when she was in the 2nd standard. Her love for playing outdoor games led her into the sport. With the support of her parents, school teachers and friends she successfully faced the challenge of balancing academics and sports.

Her success is a result of diligent and committed training. Each day she trains for four hours in good sprint workouts followed by some strength and speed endurance workout. A focus on body balance, agility and functional training gets her prepared for the competition. Access to a synthetic athletic track at Somaiya Vidyavihar and guidance from her coaches has added to her training.

Besides continuing in her athletics, Sharvari plans to study Physiotherapy or Psychology in the future.

Transcending Barriers

K J Somaiya College of Engineering hosted the  Wheelchair Cricket India and Para Wheelchair Cricket Association Maharashtra for an exhibition match as part of the inaguration of its annual sports event ‘ Skream’. This was the sixth year of the college’s national level annual sports festival ‘ Skream’.      K J Somaiya College of Engineering hosted students from over 200 institutes at the Somaiya Vidyavihar, Mumbai Campus. 

K J Somaiya College of Engineering hosted the  Wheelchair Cricket India and Para Wheelchair Cricket Association Maharashtra for an exhibition match as part of the inaguration of its annual sports event ‘ Skream’.

The National and the Maharashtra State team went head-to-head in a game of wheelchair cricket on the multipurpose court. Competing teams have had an illustrious past, with the National team having defeated the national teams of Pakistan and Bangladesh.

Paralympic sports have always held a special place in Skream. For years, Skream has strived to give a platform to paralympic sportspersons and make them accessible to the general audience.

This was the sixth year of the college’s national level annual sports festival. K J Somaiya College of Engineering hosted students from over 200 institutes at the Somaiya Vidyavihar, Mumbai Campus.   KJSCE has always been at the forefront when it comes to the nurturing and encouraging young talents in the field of sports.  Skream is a medium through which it celebrates sportsmanship and encourages budding sportspersons.

The event saw competition amongst an array of indoor and outdoor games including  Football, Cricket, Badminton, Rink Football, Chess, Throwball, Basketball, Lawn Tennis, Squash, Carrom, Box Cricket, Athletics, Volleyball, and Table Tennis.

With a state of the art infrastructure, the Somaiya Vidyavihar campus possesses some of the finest outdoor fields and courts.

Interdisciplinary Innovation in healthcare

Each year students of K J Somaiya College of Engineering work closely with faculty mentors on projects that explore innovations in engineering for applications in automobiles to medicine. These projects introduce students to the application of engineering theories, build analytic skills and help students find their own future path.Three students from K J Somaiya College of Engineering, Chirag Shah (Electronics & Telecommunication Engineering); Abhishek Rai (Mechanical Engineering): Ninad Gund (Electronics & Telecommunication Engineering) and Shreyas Seshadri (Electronics & Telecommunication Engineering) are currently collaborating to develop Robo- Rehab, a smart rehabilitation device to be used in physiotherapy.

At Somaiya Vidyavihar,  we support a campus innovation culture, connecting students, faculty and experts across campus institutions – to gather and exchange ideas.  We understand that diverse knowledge is needed to solve various real-life problems.

Each year students of K J Somaiya College of Engineering work closely with faculty mentors on projects that explore innovations in engineering for applications in automobiles to medicine. These projects introduce students to the application of engineering theories, build analytic skills and help students find their own future path.

Three students from K J Somaiya College of Engineering, Chirag Shah (Electronics & Telecommunication Engineering); Abhishek Rai (Mechanical Engineering): Ninad Gund (Electronics & Telecommunication Engineering) and Shreyas Seshadri (Electronics & Telecommunication Engineering) are currently collaborating to develop Robo- Rehab, a smart rehabilitation device to be used in physiotherapy.

Physical Rehabilitation is done manually by physiotherapists for recovery from strokes, joint, replacements, fractures, arthritis etc. This procedure generally involves the physiotherapist aiding the movements of particular joints to improve range of motion, reduce stiffness and gain control. Manual treatment is both exhausting and time consuming for the physiotherapists. Available devices are bulky, complex to operate, have a high setup time, and generally target only a specific joint.

Robo-Rehab is a smart rehabilitation device for the arm, with provision for multiple modes of exercising, hence allowing it to be used in various stages of physical rehabilitation for a wide array of ailments like stroke rehabilitation, post joint replacement surgeries, during fracture recovery. The device can be controlled using an android application that simplifies the interaction with the device for the physiotherapist and can provide access to patient progress over time. A gamified experience using virtual reality is also being conceptualised to accelerate the patient’s progress.

Robo Rehab 3Chirag and Abhishek are being guided by Dr Anjali Puntambekar, and Dr Mugdha Oberoi professors from K. J. Somaiya College of Physiotherapy for a better understanding of existing physiotherapy equipment and treatment procedures.

The funding from KJSCE enabled the students to work on the project and an opportunity to participate in Smart India Hackathon Hardware Edition 2018. Post-graduation, the students are being guided by KJSCE and Somaiya RiiDL, the incubation initiative of Somaiya Vidyavihar to learn entrepreneurship.

From acquiring the know-how of developing a product to starting a company, review sessions and guidance from the Somaiya RiiDL team, guidance from Dr Radha Iyer, SIMSR on market research students are carving the road ahead.

The prototype has been showcased at the Smart India Hackathon Grand Finale Hardware Edition 2018 as well as Maker Faire Hyderabad 2018.

Says Chirag, with a sparkle in eyes and a smile in his face “Dr Shubha Pandit has encouraged and inspired us. The contribution of various other Somaiya Vidyavihar Institutes has been tremendous. It has been the inputs and support from across Somaiya Vidyavihar that makes it possible for us to dream and work towards making a difference”.

Chirag Shah and Abhishek Rai were awarded “Mentor’s Choice for Best Prototype” in the ‘Two Days Workshop on Design of Medical Products: Practical Insights and Lessons’ Organized jointly by TATA Trusts PATH Impact Lab (TPIL), Venture Center & Social Alpha on 23rd – 24th November 2018.  They have also received approval from SINE IIT Bombay committee, for funding support under the DST NIDHI-PRAYAS.

 

Making the dream a reality! by Shri Samir Somaiya

My grandfather said, why not Somaiya. I said, no Chemical Engineering here, and Cornell is far better than Somaiya. He did not mind that. But said, ‘Go, but promise me, that when you return, in your lifetime, you will try to make our institutions to good, that if a candidate applies to Cornell, he/she will also apply to Somaiya’. And he allowed me to fly.
He traded dreams. Made my dreams his, and his mine. How powerful!!

Dear friends,

Last month I was invited to speak at the South Asia Programme at Cornell. I was asked to speak on, how my student days at Cornell (and elsewhere), have influenced the work we do at the Somaiya Institutions.

I thought deeply about that, and thought, that the best way to communicate that was visual.  

I want to go to CornellI explained to them, that I just applied to Cornell, since my friend was, and I gave the exams and made the applications to ‘give him company’. When I did get admission, I was very keen to go and asked for permission. My mom was ok, father was not, but if grandfather (K. J. Somaiya) allowed, I could go.

He said, why not Somaiya. I said, no Chemical Engineering here, and Cornell is far better than Somaiya. He did not mind that. But said, ‘Go, but promise me, that when you return, in your lifetime, you will try to make our institutions to good, that if a candidate applies to Cornell, he/she will also apply to Somaiya’. And he allowed me to fly.

He traded dreams. Made my dreams his, and his mine. How powerful!!

M Eng Graduation 1992
A picture of my grandparents when they came for my Masters Graduation. K. J. Somaiya is 90 years old

When he arrived, he saw our sports field at Cornell. He said, why can we not have such a field on our campus. And he planned it. However, he could not see it built. So, the first thing I did, when I took charge, is that I developed a 400 m running track in 2011.

I had learnt from him to observe, and if you see something that is good, ten quickly adopt it. But do not be blind. Take what is good, and leave behind what is not. And that, in everything, there is a good and a bad.

Many years ago, while walking near the University of Geneva, in Switzerland, I had seen a giant Chess Board, and so:

When I attended Cornell, the first thing I noticed, was that there were gardens everywhere and that the landscape was very inviting. On our campuses, we had buildings, but the space between buildings was unattended. So, I thought of creating gardens, and green spaces. And areas for sports. At the Vidyavihar campus, we have done a lot, at the Ayurvihar campus, we still have a lot to do.

The picture below shows the founder’s garden just before, and after completion. What I am not showing, and did not show at Cornell, that many years ago, there was too much litter on our campus. I am so proud, that we take pride in our campus spaces, and feel quite terrible when I see people throwing trash.

I also saw lovely sculptures on the campus at Cornell and thought that we should have them too. For example, they had a nice statue of their founder. But high up. I thought that we should have one too. But not so high. Shri K. J. Somaiya had written in his notes:

કોઈને ઉપયોગી થવાની તક ન ખોવી
Do not lose an opportunity to be useful to others.

Similarly, I put a statue of my father, that was so wonderfully unveiled by His Holiness The Dalai Lama in early 2017. When I met him after my father’s death, he pointed to me and said ‘you look like your father, your father was my friend’. I felt blessed.

My father. Dr Shantilal Somaiya did much to establish communication with various religions, at the highest level.

Similarly, I had never stayed in a hostel. And lived at Cornell housing for three years. They had nice buildings and nice gardens outside.

Well, I think our Maitreyi looks better than Alice Cook house – What do you think?

There were also other changes to make. As late as 2010, we did not have common ID cards. Each institution had their own. There was no common campus identity. In fact, students were discouraged from going to other parts of the campus (canteens, etc). At Cornell, I noticed a common campus identity and thought that we must also have one.

When I studied at Harvard, I really liked their bookstore – the Harvard Coop. So, Amrita and I decided to build one like that in Mumbai too. So, if you have not visited Kitabkhana, you are welcome to visit (it is at Fountain). I think books are necessary. We have become too used to reading 3 minutes (or less) at a time. Books are windows to a different world. They need our time; we need to get lost inside them. Kitabkhana is a place to lose oneself. दिल ढूँढता है, फिर वही फुर्सत के रात दिन……(movie मौसम – शायर – गुलज़ार)

The academic environment was also very refreshing at Cornell. I also teach there. I can decide my curriculum, readings, the method of evaluation etc. I realised, that here we had to teach what the University told us. That had to change, and that is why we applied for autonomy and got that in many institutions. If one has to grow, then one has to learn to think for oneself, decide what is worth learning, how much, and what is ok to leave behind.

We have started a Master’s in Polymer Science, a Master’s in Healthcare management, and are planning a host of other initiatives. Within courses, and in new programmes.

Cornell also had many project groups. I still remember, speaking to the students after having received a copy of the Cornell magazine, describing how Cornell had one the Formula racing competition. And I wondered, that are these competitions only for Universities such as Cornell. Can we not compete? I challenged our students. And now, we have so many groups.

Recently at the MIT Media Lab (where I also took some courses), I saw that the walls of the classrooms were made of glass. So, we have also created glass walls at the extension building of the K J Somaiya Institute of Engineering and Information Technology.

In fact, our incubator space riidl, was also inspired by a similar visit at the MIT Media Lab.

While visiting Cornell Tech, the recent New York City campus of Cornell University (that was gifted to Cornell by New York City – and that speaks volumes for a City’s commitment to higher education, given how much we need to struggle), I saw that they had started a startup studio. I suggested that to riidl, and we created a similar programme here as well.

And then to take students from one campus to another (their medical campus is a four and a half hour drive from the parent campus – ours is a twenty-minute drive), they have a bus that continuously moves between them. That helped create joint and interdisciplinary projects.

In medicine, the challenge has been to create an institution that provides great care to all. In India, poor go to teaching hospitals and those who can afford it, to expensive ones. In the USA, everyone prefers to go to a teaching hospital. I wanted to make ours like that. And so we added a super speciality wing to our hospital, to improve the overall hospital.

My father passed away in Australia, in a teaching hospital, where he was taken after he slipped and fell, and hurt his head. Though he did not survive, I thought we should have a similar emergency room in our hospital.

K J Somaiya Medical College

But we are also different in many ways. We do work in adult education, in underprivileged areas. We have built a gorgeous centre at Jetavan, in Sakarwadi. This initiative by the K J Somaiya Centre for Buddhist Studies was built using quarry dust, fly ash, jute, cow dung, and old style casting techniques from Kutch.

We recently inaugurated the Maya Somaiya library (named after my mother), that was ‘Highly Commended’ by the magazine Architecture Review (only one of three such this year), and was covered in the international magazine Domus.

We also do work at Nareshwadi – to work in health, education, and livelihood of the tribal community. And we have a 100 student बालकाश्रम. We also teach artisans in Kutch business management and principles of design. Their convocation is the best I have ever seen, with graduates walking down the ramp in a fashion show, in a village with more than 6000 in the audience. And the audience is full of friends and family.

We are a rare institution, where the K J Somaiya Vidyapeeth conducts its entire curriculum in Sanskrit, run by the Rashtriya Sanskrit Sansthan.

But this is only the beginning. In the future, we want to build a school of Indian music and dance, of the arts, painting, drama. We want to build a museum. We want to build more science laboratories, more health care facilities, more sports facilities. More places to live, learn and live some more.

Sanskriti

It is only possible to do because of what they founded, dreamt, and built.

I made a promise to my grandfather. In the words of another poet:
It will take time, but many of you are walking with me in making that dream a reality. From the housekeeping staff who cleans the campus, the student who imagines a lander on a Jovian moon, the doctor working in Pratikshanagar, the teacher preparing his/her lecture notes and thousands of you, we are all in this together.

Please continue walking with me in fulfilling that promise.

In the words of Kaifi Azmi: उठ मेरी जान, मेरे साथ ही चलना है तुझे

Samir

 

Inspired, inspires

Chirag’, young entrepreneur and ex-alumni of K J Somaiya College of Engineering, working on his project at Somaiya Riidl, lit the fire of innovation and entrepreneurship in the minds of students from  Shri Sharda English Medium School, Kopergaon who came visiting Somaiya Vidyavihar, Mumbai.

True to his name ‘ Chirag’, young entrepreneur and alumnus of K J Somaiya College of Engineering, working on his project at Somaiya Riidl, lit the fire of innovation and entrepreneurship in the minds of students from  Shri Sharda English Medium School, Kopergaon who came visiting Somaiya Vidyavihar, Mumbai.

An animated discussion on how to select ideas for entrepreneurship, where to get information on the internet for engineering apps, to how to polish ideas.  Meeting a young entrepreneur made the possibilities of entrepreneurship real for the students.

It is these special moments that inspire.

In our campus – a tree rarely found in Mumbai

This particular tree would be familiar to passers-by who walk on the quiet lane near       K J Somaiya College of Arts and Commerce. For some, in a hurry to reach the class or the tracks, chances are of walking past it and not noticing it.

Dr Sugandha Shetye, K J Somaiya College of Science & Commerce says “The lush tree has sweet-scented pink flowers in drooping racemes. The tree, Barringtonia acutangula, also known as freshwater mangrove and colloquially as Tiwar typically grows along the rivers and is very rarely found in Mumbai.

When stepping onto the Somaiya Vidyavihar campus in Mumbai, most visitors are amazed at the greenery.  For us, every tree is valuable. Besides providing clean air to breathe,  and cool shade, the greenery in the campus creates a sense of community.

 

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This particular tree would be familiar to passers-by who walk on the quiet lane near       K J Somaiya College of Arts and Commerce. For some, in a hurry to reach the class or the tracks, chances are of walking past it and not noticing it.

Dr Sugandha Shetye, K J Somaiya College of Science & Commerce says “The lush tree has sweet-scented pink flowers in drooping racemes. The tree, Barringtonia acutangula, also known as freshwater mangrove and colloquially as Tiwar typically grows along the rivers and is very rarely found in Mumbai. The flowers bloom only during night and wilt in the morning.”

Different parts of Barringtonia acutangula such as leaves, fruit, roots and axillary bud have been used traditionally to treat pains in the body, eye ailments, abdominal disturbances, blood impurities, cold, and asthma, diseases of liver, spleen and for diabetes. The root and leaves of Barringtonia acutangula possess hypolipidemic, antibacterial and antifungal activity respectively in various animal studies.

The flora on our campus remains integral to its beauty. The diversity of trees reflects our history and growth.

 

M.Sc. Applied Statistics

The underlying philosophy of the M.Sc. Statistics course is to develop the theoretical and analytical skills of the students so that they may be absorbed in the corporate world or be able to pursue higher research work in Statistics.

K. J. Somaiya College of Science and Commerce, Department of Statistics has announced a new course in M.Sc. Applied Statistics.

Need for M.Sc. Applied Statistics course

In Mumbai,  M.Sc. Statistics course is available only at Mumbai University and a few other institutes. All these institutes are located in the western suburbs of Mumbai. No college on Central suburbs of Mumbai teaching this M.Sc. Applied Statistics course.
Every year only 120 students get admission for M.Sc. Statistics course due to the limited number of seats in Mumbai for this course.
Statistics is an interdisciplinary subject. There is a huge demand for statisticians in industries, academics and research work for data analysis.
Machine learning and Artificial intelligence are emerging areas where a huge number of statisticians is required.

Learning outcome

The underlying philosophy of the M.Sc. Statistics course is to develop the theoretical and analytical skills of the students so that they may be absorbed in the corporate world or be able to pursue higher research work in Statistics.

By the end of the course, learners should be able to:

  • define statistical terms
  • comprehend statistical concepts and relationships in the economic and social aspects among others
  • interpret, use and present information in written, graphical, diagrammatic and tabular terms
  • deduce and infer through manipulation of statistical expressions
  • enable efficient use of statistical software such as SPSS, Python, R etc. to solve statistical problems
  • develop the ability to use statistical knowledge and skills in other disciplines
    stimulate the exercising of value decisions/judgments based on the scientific approach
  • acquire a suitable foundation for further studies and related disciplines
    appreciate the beauty and crucial role of statistics in national development

Job opportunities and Industries 

Statistics being an interdisciplinary subject, a good number of jobs are available in various fields such as academics, agriculture, pharmaceuticals, biostatisticians, information technology, machine learning, artificial intelligence etc.

 

First among equals

Sangeetha, a class VIII student of K J Somaiya English Medium School, a school of Somaiya Vidyavihar in Rural Karnataka, not only participated in the National Mathematics Olympiad, she came First, competing with a whopping 65,000 competitors from across India.

Very few girls who have just turned 13 can tell you what they want to do in their life. If they live in a rural area, the probability is even less. But defying all the odds, one such girl is Sangeetha. If you ask her, she will say, “I want to study in the IIT”.

For a girl in rural India, life does not give you many choices, to show your talent to the world. Sangeetha, a class VIII student of K J Somaiya English Medium School, a school of Somaiya Vidyavihar in Rural Karnataka, not only participated in the National Mathematics Olympiad, she came First, competing with a whopping 65,000 competitors from across India.

The winning did not come easy. She first attempted the exam when she was in seventh grade and then again in Grade Eighth. Sharing her happiness with everyone, she says, “It was a great opportunity for me, and I got to learn a lot from it.”

This achievement is the result of consistent hard work for months everyday secured her big change in life. She had attempted the same exam in the previous year, but unsatisfied with the result, she gave it a shot once again.

Mr Sachin Hossati, her Maths teacher who guided her, says “She came to me with questions every day. For 1 to 1 ½ hour daily she studied various mental ability questions as well practised solving previous year’s papers”. Sangeetha’s positive confidence does not mean the journey was a fairytale. In the beginning, she had a hard time coping up with the level of complexity. But staying true to herself, she fought the fears with the help of her family, who always believed in her. Her father, Anilkumar, says, “She is a self-independent and a hardworking kid, who never required any motivation from us”.

Sangeetha is now more assured of her positive future than she ever could have been. “I thank the School Authorities, the Principal and my Math teacher for their tremendous support. I was overwhelmed when I knew I won. The unexpected recognition for my effort gives me a sense of confidence. This prize has encouraged me to work even harder and to strengthen my desire.”